folie a deux, a madness shared by two
purrrrrrrrrple:

Fucking awesome Heather

purrrrrrrrrple:

Fucking awesome Heather

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.
But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.
Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.
In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.
Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.

But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.

Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.

In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.

Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

mandown456:

freexcitizen:

joeymuffin:

therapsida:

hello yes can I have 6 quarts of bb tiger

The kitten is in a “puppy” cup.

The hamster

Yes. A&W I would like a cup of your root beer and please put some extra bunny rabbit on top.

Happy Birthday, Chloe Bennet! (April 18th, 1992)

kateordie:

comicsalliance:

FAKE GEEK GUYS: A MESSAGE TO MEN ABOUT SEXUAL HARASSMENT
By Andy Khouri
“I think this woman is wrong about something on the Internet. Clearly my best course of action is to threaten her with rape.”
That’s crazy talk, right? So why does it happen all the time?
Honest question, dudes.
That women are harassed online is not news. That women in comics and the broader fandom cultures are harassed online is not news. That these women are routinely transmitted anonymous messages describing graphic sexual violence perpetrated upon them for transgressions as grave as not liking a thing… that is actually news to me, and it’s probably news to a lot of you guys reading this.
So what do we do about it?
This.
READ MORE

This is important.

kateordie:

comicsalliance:

FAKE GEEK GUYS: A MESSAGE TO MEN ABOUT SEXUAL HARASSMENT

By Andy Khouri

“I think this woman is wrong about something on the Internet. Clearly my best course of action is to threaten her with rape.”

That’s crazy talk, right? So why does it happen all the time?

Honest question, dudes.

That women are harassed online is not news. That women in comics and the broader fandom cultures are harassed online is not news. That these women are routinely transmitted anonymous messages describing graphic sexual violence perpetrated upon them for transgressions as grave as not liking a thing… that is actually news to me, and it’s probably news to a lot of you guys reading this.

So what do we do about it?

This.

READ MORE

This is important.

The purpose of literature is to turn blood into ink.
T.S. Eliot (via feellng)

voldemeyers:

screencap meme: looking down + x files

(asked by: donnanobilis)

chucklestheboywonder:

WHY DOES THIS MAKE ME SO HAPPY EVERYTIME I SEE IT

chucklestheboywonder:

WHY DOES THIS MAKE ME SO HAPPY EVERYTIME I SEE IT

jamescookjr:

The Relationship of Brittany Pierce & Santana Lopez

Santana: Sex is not dating. 
Brittany: If it were, Santana and I would be dating.

Santana: Let us give you an introduction into the way we work. You buy us dinner, we make out in front of you. It’s like, the best deal ever.

Kurt: Thanks, Britt. Thanks a lot.
Santana: Leave Brittany alone.
Brittany: Thank you for understanding. It’s been a hard road.

[sings Me Against The Music in Dream]
Brittany: When I had my teeth cleaned, I had the most amazing Britney Spears fantasy. I sang and danced better than her. Now I realize what a powerful woman I truly am.  
Santana: I went with her, and I had a Britney fantasy, too. Although now that I’m thinking about it, I’m not really sure how our fantasies combined.

Read More


…and dating.

…and dating.

tenfootpolesociety:

shavingryansprivates:

why he lick me

THIS IS SUPER COOL THOUGH IF YOU UNDERSTAND HORSES. LIKE THAT NIPPING IS A GROOMING BEHAVIOR HORSE’S DO TO BOND AND TO MAINTAIN AND IMPROVE SOCIAL BONDS. SO THAT HORSE IS BASICALLY TREATING THE CAT AS PART OF THE HERD AND SUSTAINING THE FRIENDLY BOND.

IT IS SAYING, “this tiny horse is very tiny but we are friends. Look at my tiny friend.”

  » “The other night, I helped save someone’s life. That felt really good. And I look at you, and all I can think is that you helped kill Boyd. You’re not just a bad boy, Aiden, you’re a bad guy. And I don’t want to be with the bad guys.”

koboldandthebeautiful:

notcuddles:

titusnowl:

beer has only been a Man Thing since the early modern era

throughout the medieval period (and i’m pretty sure in some cultures there’s evidence going back much further) making ale was a woman thing, there weren’t male brewers but female alewives, the pubkeeper wasn’t a red-cheeked badger-like man but a woman who opened her house to serve her own fresh ale. the association between women and brewing (not just for beer but in general - women were their household’s pharmacists in this period as well) is part of why it’s so natural for witches, who are ladies, to have potions bubbling in their cauldrons

then basically as the early modern era happened n cities got bigger n industries in general began to move out of the home into dedicated industrial spaces it was mostly men who had enough capital to buy buildings to turn into professional breweries (because of all the patriarchal economical bullshit) and those men, who had to have learned how to make beer from women, got together and made professional brewer’s guilds and the first rule was no ladies in the professional brewer’s guilds

and that is how men stole beer from women

I’ve been angry about this for, like, at least three days now.  Maybe more.

there is indeed evidence going back much further. current historical and archaeological evidence suggests that in the very earliest beer brewing societies in the fertile crescent beer production may have been exclusively a women’s practice there too.